Help How a round is resolved

Each round is resolved as follows in the following sequence:

  1. Each fighter regains 15% of the endurance points he has lost. For instance, if the fighter started the bout with 120 endurance points and has 90 endurance points remaining at the end of round 3, then he has lost 30 endurance points. He regains 4.5 endurance points between rounds and begins round 4 with 94.5 endurance points (fractions are retained).

    In addition, if a fighter used less than 20 energy points during the previous round, he regains an additional 2% of his lost endurance for each point of unused energy. If, in the previous example, the fighter had spent only 18 energy points in round 3, he would regain an additional 2 * 0.02 * 30 = 1.2 endurance points between rounds, thus starting round 4 with 95.7 endurance points.

  2. The effects of each fighters' fighting style is computed as follows:
    •  
    • Fighting Inside -- The fighter moves in close to throw powerful uppercuts and hooks. The fighter's STR is increased by 1.5 and any STR advantage he has over his opponent is increased by 50%. However, the fighter's AGL is decreased by 15%.

      For example, suppose a fighter uses this style with a STR of 15 and an AGL of 10, against an opponent with a STR of 11. The fighter's STR advantage is 15-11 = 4. His STR is therefore increased by 1.5 + 4/2 = 3.5, while his AGL is decreased by 15%. This leaves him with an effective STR of 18.5 and an effective AGL of 8.5.

      Also note that when a taller fighter fights inside he loses some of the benefit of being taller, as described below.

    • Clinching The fighter holds his opponent to avoid being hit. This has a number of effects:
      1.  
      2. If the fighter has a higher AGL than his opponent, half of his AGL advantage is lost (since he is holding rather than moving.)
      3. The fighter gains 1.5 AGL points.
      4. If the fighter has a higher STR than his opponent, half of his STR advantage is added to his AGL.
      5. Because a clinching fighter is less active, the fighter's AGG is reduced by 1 point (but never below 1). These lost points are used for resting and increase his endurance point recovery. [A clinching fighter is an inactive fighter.]
      6. If the fighter uses a DEF greater than 10 he may be penalized for not breaking a clinch.

      For example, consider a fighter with an STR of 12 and an AGL of 13 clinching against an opponent with STR 10 and AGL 10. The fighter gains 1.5 points of AGL for clinching, and an addition (12-10)/2 = 1 point of AGL for being stronger than his opponent. However, he started with an AGL advantage of (13-10)=3 and he loses half of that (1.5 points). He therefore gains a total of 1 point of AGL for clinching.

      Also note that when a taller fighter clinches he loses some of the benefit of being taller, as described above.

    • Feinting In this style, the fighter tries to confuse his opponent to land better blows. The fighter's SPD is increased by 1.5 and any SPD advantage he has is increased by 50%. For example, if a fighter with SPD 12 feints against an opponent with SPD 10, the fighter's SPD is increased by a total of 2.5 to 14.5.

      However, a fighter using this style loses 1 point of AGG. Unlike the clinching style, the lost point is not used for resting and the fighter fatigues as if he had used the point of AGG. [The fighter is wasting effort trying to confuse his opponent.]

    • Counter-Punching In this style, a fast fighter waits for his opponent to attack and then counter-punches. If the fighter has a higher SPD than his opponent, then 25% of his SPD advantage is added to his AGL (for "striking first") and 25% is subtracted from his opponent's AGL -- to a maximum of 50% of the opponent's AGL.

      For example, suppose that fighter A has SPD 13 and AGL 10, while fighter Bhas SPD 10 and AGL 11. Fighter A therefore has a 3 point SPD advantage. If fighter Acounter-punches, his AGL is increased by 3/4 = 0.75 points to 10.75 while his opponent's AGL is decreased by 0.75 to 10.25.

      However, if counter-punching is used against an opponent with a higher SPD, then counter-punching backfires [he hits you first] and the fighter's AGL is decreased by an amount equal to half his SPD disadvantage. In the example above, if fighter B counter-punches, then his AGL is reduced by 1.5 to 9.5.

      In addition, when a fighter counter-punches his AGG is reduced below that of his opponent (but never below 1). The lost energy points are used for resting, just as with the clinching style. So, for example, if a counter-puncher uses an AGG of 6 and his opponent uses an AGG of 5, the counter-puncher's AGG is reduced to 4, and the two missing energy points are used for resting.

      If a counter-puncher's opponent uses feinting or clinching, then the counter-puncher's AGG reduction takes place after his opponent's AGG reduction.

      If both fighters counter-punch, then each fighter has his AGG reduced by 1 point.

    • Using the Ring The fighter defends himself using movement and footwork. His AGL is increased by 1.5 and any AGL advantage he has over his opponent is increased by 50%. However, the fighter's STR is decreased by 15%. (This is, in effect, the inverse of fighting inside.)
    • Cutting Off the Ring Using this style, a fighter tries to chase his opponent into a corner or against the ropes. If the fighter has a higher AGL than his opponent, than his opponent's AGL is reduced by the difference. However, a fighter's AGL may never be reduced by more than 10% from this rule. In addition, when a fighter uses this style he loses 0.25 endurance points for every point of AGG due to the additinal energy required to force his opponent into a corner.
    • Fighting Outside If a taller fighter uses this style, his height advantage is increased by 50%. Note that this increases both his SPD and his AGL. However, the fighter's STR is decreased by 15%, since he is throwing more jabs and fewer upper cuts and hooks.
    • All-Out Assault When a fighter uses this style, the damage he inflicts is doubled, but the damage inflicted on him is quadrupled. In addition, if he is shorter than his opponent, his opponent's entire HGT advantage is added to SPD rather than being split between SPD and AGL.

    It is important to note that all of these effects are computed simultaneously. For example, suppose that fighter A fights inside, gaining 3 points of STR and losing 1.5 points of AGL. If his opponent uses the ring, his AGL bonus is computed before subtracting 1.5 from A's AGL.

    In addition, no fighter's STR, AGL, or SPD is ever reduced below "1" by the effects of these styles.

  3. The effect of height is determined. The taller fighter has his SPD and AGL increased by half the difference in heights. So a fighter with a HGT of 13 fighting a fighter with a HGT of 10 would have his SPD and AGL each increased by 1.5 points.

    This "height bonus" may be altered by fighting styles, as follows:

     
    Taller fighter fighting "inside" or "clinching":
    bonus is halved.
    Taller fighter fighting "outside":
    bonus is increased by 50%.
    Shorter fighter using an "all-out" style:
    Entire HGT advantage is added to SPD, none to AGL.

    For example, if fighter A with HGT 12 fights an opponent with HGT 8, then fighter Awould ordinarily gain 2 points of SPD and 2 points of AGL. If, however, fighter Afights outside, he will gain 3 points of SPD and 3 points of AGL. If he fights inside or clinches he will only gain 1 point of SPD and 1 point of AGL. If his opponent uses an all-out style, then A would gain 4, 6, or 2 points of SPD and no points of AGL (since his opponent is rushing him).

  4. Each fighter's STR, SPD, and AGL are reduced in proportion to the number of endurance points he has lost. For example, suppose a fighter began the bout with 100 endurance points but begins the round with 80 endurance points. Then the fighter's STR, SPD, and AGL are each multiplied by 0.8. These values are used for the remainder of the round.
  5. Warnings, penalties, and disqualifications are determined.

    Ifa fighter is fighting dirty this round, there is a 50% chance that he will be warned by a referee. The first time a fighter is warned there is a 10% chance that he will be disqualified and lose the bout by a foul. The second warning, there a 20% chance of disqualification, then 40%, then 80%, then automatic DQ. After one warning, the fighter has one point taken away from him, even if he is not disqualified.

    There is also be a 1.5% chance that a fighter will be warned even if he is not fighting dirty. (This reflects the chance of unintentional fouls and bad refereeing.) This warning is treated as a normal warning except that the fighter is never disqualified as a result of an unintentional foul.

    If a fighter is clinching and using a very high DEF, there is a chance that he will be penalized for refusing to break a clinch. The probability that he will be penalized is computed by taking the square of his DEF and dividing by 4. For example, if a fighter uses a clinching style with a DEF of 10, he would have a 10*10/4 = 25% chance of being penalized for holding.

    If a fighter is penalized and wins the round, then one point is added to his opponent's score. If a fighter is penalized and either he loses the round or the round is a tie, then one point is subtracted from his score.

  6. A DEF_RATE is calculated for each fighter according to the following formula:

    DEF_RATE = DEF * AGL

    where "*" stands for multiplication.

    As a special case, however, the DEF_RATE is never lower than "1".

  7. Each fighter throws 8 * AGG punches. However, not all of these punches normally score. The number of punches that land solidly enough to be scored by a judge is computed by

    (8 * AGG * SPD) / sqrt(3 * OPP(DEF_RATE))

    where "sqrt" is the square root, and OPP(DEF_RATE) is the opponent's DEF_RATE. This number is then randomized slightly, but is usually within 10% of the above figure.

    If a fighter is not boxing opportunistically (i.e. he's throwing head punches or body blows) then his score is reduced by 15%.

    Finally, no fighter may land more than 8*AGG punches. If the above number exceeds 8*AGG, the number of punches landed is reduced to 8*AGG.

    The above calculation gives the number of punches that land. The number of punches actually scored by each of the three judges is slightly randomized, to simulate human error.

  8. Each fighter does a certain amount of damage to his opponent. This damage is calculated as follows:

    Damage = POW * STR * sqrt(AGG * SPD) / OPP(DEF_RATE)

    This number is randomized slightly, but is normally within 10% of the above figure.

    The damage may be modified as follows:

    1. When a fighter is throwing head punches, damage is decreased by 15%.
    2. When a fighter is throwing body blows, damage is increased by 15%.
    3. When a fighter is fighting dirty, damage is increased by 10%, unless he is issued a warning by a referee for foul blows, in which case he only gets a 5% damage bonus that round.

    These increases and decreases are implemented successively. For example, if a fighter is throwing body blows and fighting dirty in the same round, the damage is multiplied by 1.15 for body blows, and multiplied again by 1.1, for a total of 1.215.

    The damage inflicted on each fighter is subtracted from his endurance points.

  9. Either or both fighter may be injured.

    The base chance of a fighter being injured in a round is DAM*DAM/10% (where "DAM" is the damage sustained that round). This probability is multiplied by 1.5 if the opponent is throwing head punches and by 0.25 if the fighter is throwing body blows. For example, if a fighter sustains 12 points of damage, his chance of being injured is (12*12/10)% = 14.4%. If his opponent is throwing head punches, his chance of injury is increased to 21.6%, and if he's throwing body blows the chance is reduced to 7.2%.

    A fighter may be injured repeatedly in the same round. If he is injured once, then he has the same chance of being injured a second time, and a third, and a fourth, etc. until he "misses" one injury. However, the chance of sustaining a second or further injury is never greater than 50%, no matter how much damage was sustained.

    If a fighter sustained an injury in an earlier round, there is a chance that the injury will be aggravated. This chance is equal to the chance of sustaining a new injury that round, but is additional to the chance of a new injury. Howevr,, the chance of aggravating an existing injury is never more than 50%, no matter how damage was sustained.

    If a fighter sustains a new injury that is identical to a previous injury, then the injury is considered aggravated and is not treated as a new injury.

    The effects of injury are fairly complicated and are discussed in a separate section.

  10. Depending on the damage done to each fighter during the round, the fighter may be knocked down or knocked out. The amount of damage required to knock down or KO a fighter is based on his starting endurance points (i.e., 10*TGH) according to the following:
    • Opponent is boxing opportunistically:
      • 15% of starting endurance -- fighter is knocked down.
      • 20% -- fighter is knocked down twice.
      • 25% -- fighter is knocked out.
    • Opponent is throwing head punches:
      • 10% of starting endurance -- fighter is knocked down.
      • 12.5% -- fighter is knocked down twice.
      • 15% -- fighter is knocked out.
    • Opponent is throwing body blows:
      • 25% of starting endurance -- fighter is knocked down.
      • 30% -- fighter is knocked down twice.
      • 35% -- fighter is knocked out.

    For purposes of this rule, the damage done is computed before taking into account the effects of body blows or head punches. That is the 1.15 multiplier (for body blows) or 0.85 multiplier (for head punches) is not applied until after knockdowns and knockouts have been determined.

    [Warning: This paragraph is confusing and not very important.] Match reports sometimes show a fighter being knocked down and KO'd in the same round. This happens because any damage in excess of that required to KO a fighter is used again to determine the number of knockdowns. For example, if a fighter with 100 endurance points has 25 points of damage inflicted by an opponent who is throwing head punches, then only 15 points of damage are required for a KO. The remaining 10 points of damage are enough to cause a knockdown. Thus, the fighter is knocked down and then knocked out. However, for technical reasons the "knockdown" and the "knockout" are reported in random order and, if the knockout occurs first then the knockdown does not appear on the match report.

  11. If a fighter's endurance is reduced to 0 or less, then the fighter cannot continue the bout and a TKO occurs.
  12. Each fighter loses one endurance point for each energy point spent on AGG (due to fatigue).
  13. If no KO or TKO has occurred, we move on to the next round.

Note that it is possible for both fighters to be KO'd or TKO'd in the same round. In that case, we choose the winner by calculating, for each fighter, the ratio of the damage required to cause a KO or TKO to the damage actually done. This ratio gives an estimate of how early in the round a fighter was KO'd or TKO'd. A similar comparison is used when both a KO and a TKO are inflicted on the same fighter in the same round.

It is also possible for a fighter to be DQ'd (for fighting diry) in the same round that he scores a KO or is KO'd. In this case, the following rules apply:

  1. If a fighter is DQ'd in the same round that he scores a (T)KO, his (T)KO is disregarded.
  2. If a fighter is DQ'd and (T)KO'd in the same round, the (T)KO takes priority.

These rules ensure the least favorable result for a fighter who is DQ'd.

Effects of Injury

When a fighter is injured, the location and severity of that injury are determined randomly. The following locations are possible (most are equally likely, but swellings are twice as likely as other types of injury):

[We have omitted concussions and injuries to a fighter's hand. Concussions are really subsumed under the damage a fighter has taken. Injuries to a fighter's hand would normally cause a complete revision of the fighter's fight plan. Planning for this possibility would make a fighter's fight plan much more complex.]

The severity or level of an injury is a number from 1-4. When an injury occurs, there is 2/3 chance it will be of level "1", a 2/9 chance of level "2", a 2/27 chance it will be level "3", and 1/27 chance of level "4".

The effects of an injury depend on the type of injury and on the level of the injury:

 
Bleeding above or below an eye:
A bleeding injury is called a minor cut, a cut, a serious cut, or a gash according to the level of the injury.

A cut causes a fighter to sustain one point of damage for every level of injury.

A cut over the eye also interferes with a fighter's vision. This causes the fighter to lose 0.5 points of SPD for every level of injury. In addition, a serious cut over the eye causes the fighter to lose 0.5 points of AGL, and a gash over the eye causes the fighter to lose 1 point of AGL.

Swelling above an eye.
Swelling always starts at level 1, but every time it is aggravated the level of swelling increases. At level 3 the eye is said to have swollen shut. If both a fighter's eyes are swollen shut the fighter loses by TKO.

Swelling can seriously interfere with a fighter's vision. A level 2 swelling causes the fighter to lose 1 point of SPD and 1 point of AGL. If an eye is swollen shut the fighter loses 2 points of SPD and 2 points of AGL.

Injured nose.
A level 1 injury is a bloody nose, a level 2 or 3 injury is a fractured nose, and a level 4 injury is a broken nose. For a level 2 or greater injury, the fighter sustains one point of damage for each level of injury. At any level, the fighter fatigues an extra 1 point per round to reflect the fact that he cannot breathe properly.
Injured jaw.
Level 1, 2, and 3 injuries to the jaw are ignored. A level 4 injury is said to be a broken jaw. A broken jaw is a serious and painful injury -- the fighter immediately sustains 5 points of damage. If this injury is aggravated, the fight is stopped and the injured fighter loses by TKO.

Changes to SPD and AGL due to injury do not take effect until the following round. Also, no ability is ever reduced below 1.

When an injury is aggravated, there is a 50% chance that it will be "promoted" to a level 2, 3, or 4 injury. Level 1 injuries are promoted to level 2 2/3 of the time an to level 3 2/9 of the time, and to level 4 1/9 of the time. Level 2 injuries are promoted to level 3 2/3 of the time and to level 4 1/3 of the time. Level 3 injuries are promoted to level 4. (Exception: swelling is always promoted exactly one level, to a maximum of level 3.)

When an injury is aggravated, any damage caused by that injury is repeated. For example a level 1 cut, if aggravated, causes one additional point of damage. If promoted to level 2, it would cause 2 additional points of damage.

If an injury is at level 3 or 4 and a total of 7 or more points of damage have been caused by that injury, the fight is stopped by the doctor and the injured fighter loses by TKO. The fight is also stopped by the doctor if the injury

  

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