BIG DAWG BOXING HELP

5:25 PM

04

Jan

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP INDEX

 

ALCATRAZ GYM FIGHT PLANS

 

 

Fighter Help

 

INDEX

 

Fighters Rankings

 

Bonus Points System

 

Changes in Abilities

 

Build

 

Height

 

Weight

 

Toughness

 

Agility

 

Strength

 

Speed

 

The Effects of Aging

 

Fighter Retirement

 

Auto Retirement of fighters

 

Making a comeback

 

Dumping A Fighter

Fighters Rankings

What Does it Do.

Rankings shows the best Fighters in the game based on their current Rating.

When to Use It.

If you want to find out how your fighters Rate in your region or in the game as a whole this is the place to find out

How to Use It.

Click on the Fighters link from the main nav bar, the main frame will immediately show the Current World Heavyweight Rankings. From the drop down select the Weight class, Region and Class you want to view and then press List.

Other Notes.

Click on any fighter name or manager name to bring up their page of further information.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Bonus Points System

On Feb. 21, 2002 an exciting new bonus points system was introduced which will revolutionize the game. It works as follows:

1) You can only get bonus points (BPs) if your rating = status. If that condition is met then move to rule 2.
2) You get 200 BPs for a win.
3) Add another 50 BPs if you are on a winning streak.
4) Add another 100 BPs if you win by KO. (Note this was increased from 50 effective March 17, 2003)
5) Add another 50 BPs if you win by KO in the 1st or 12th round.
6) Add another 25 BPs if you win by unanimous decision.
7) Add another 25 BPs if you win by a commanding unanimous decision (your winning margin is 10 or more points when the three judges scores are combined).
8) Add another 75 BPs if your opponent was rated higher than you entering the fight.
9) Subtract 75 BPs if your opponent was rated lower than you entering the fight.

Once your BPs total 300 you will gain an AP and your BP total will begin accumulating again from zero.
 

Also new is a bonus point report contained at the end of each private fight report. It details how many BPs you gained from the fight; how many you had going into the fight and any ability changes which may result.
It is important to note that if condition one is not met (meaning rating is not equal to status) then 0 BPs will be earned regardless of what may be stated later in the report.

The Old Bonus Point System (For reference only)

For the purposes of scouting fighters who fought prior to Feb. 21, 2002, here is the old bonus points system. It is no longer in effect.

Prior to Feb. 21, 2002 bonus points for the winner of a fight were calculated as follows:

1) After the fight the winner gets 50 BP's for winning. He gets another 50 FBP's if he won by KO or TKO. However, if the fighter has had 60 or more fights, you can pretty much ignore this and everything that follows since at 60 fights fighters stop getting bonus points.

2) If this win is the second in a row (or more) for the winner he will get an additional bonus points for being on a winning streak. The exception to this is if you've just beaten a lower ranked fighter in a title fight, in which case you aren't eligible for these winning streak bonus points.

3) Now from the maximum potential 300 bonus points for the win you must subtract 75 bonus points for every point difference that your status is greater than your opponents rating. This is where most players get confused because they compare rating to rating not status to rating.

Don't worry if there's a huge difference between your fighter's rating and your opponent's status because the game will never lower your bonus points to less than they were before the fight. The worst case scenario is that you don't earn any bonus points for the win.

If after the fight you have 300 or more bonus points, the game automatically subtracts 300 bonus points and uses it to buy you a randomly allocated ability point.

Example:

Fighter a has a rating of 7, a status of 15 and 100 bonus points. He's won his last 3 fights in a row. Fighter b has a rating of 7 and a status of 7.

Fighter a beats fighter b in a fight via TKO.

Fighter a earns 50 bonus points for the win, and 50 bonus points for the TKO. He also earns 200 bonus points for being on a winning streak. 200 + 50 + 50 = 300.

From his 300 bonus points however we must subtract 600 bonus points because his status is 8 points higher than his opponent's rating. 8 X 75 = 600. 300 bonus points less a 600 point status penalty works out to -300 bonus points. The game simply treats this as 0 and awards fighter a no bonus points.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

 

When.

Changes in Abilities occur when a fighter has gained enough bonus points to train an ability point or has suffered enough damage to suffer permanent harm, or loses a fight.

Why.

Upon gaining EACH 300 Bonus points the fighter gains in the chosen ability stat, if more than one mulitple of 300 bonus points is gained then the fighter will gain the extra points in a random ability. Upon taking 300 points of damage at the end of a fight the fighter will lose one random ability point per multiple of 300 points of damage. So it is possible to win a fight but take so much damage that the fighter loses bonus points. If a fighter loses a fight they lose 1 ability point. A rank 0 fighter cannot lose ability points from losing a fight only from injuries

Effect.

The effect of ability point changes are pretty clear cut, they improve or degrade your fighter.

Other Notes.

As fighters age they lose the ability to train in various stats. This prevents fighters from dominating the regions forever.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Build
 

The build of a fighter is selected when a fighter is created and can never change during his career. Build is used to determine a fighter's weight. Please refer to the description of weight in help for more information on determining a fighter's weight. No comparisons between fighter's builds are ever made, and no other effect comes from build.

A build of medium is considered normal, and is used in the calculation for determining a fighter's weight. Any variance from a medium build will add or subtract from a fighters weight according to the following chart.

  • Barrel +15%
  • Stocky +10%
  • Broad +5%
  • Medium 0%
  • Lean -5%
  • Lanky -10%
  • Skinny -15%

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Height


The height ability is used to simulate both the height of a fighter and his reach. Taller fighters will gain additional agility and speed during a match to simulate the effect of reach. Taller fighters will also weigh more than similarly built, but shorter fighters. The height of a fighter is determined when a fighter is created and can never change during his career.

Benefits of height
Height has no direct effect on the outcome of a fight, but does directly affect a fighter's speed and agility. The taller fighter in a match will have 50% of the difference in height between the two fighters added to both his speed and his agility. For instance, if one fighter is a height 8 and his opponent is a height 3, then the taller fighter will gain 2.5 points to both agility and speed for the match.

Additional effects of height
Height has a strong effect on the weight of a fighter. Taller fighters of similar build and ability will weigh significantly more than shorter fighters. Tall fighters may have a difficult time making the lower weight classes.

Effects of styles on height
Height can never change, but the effect height has on speed and agility is affected by the styles used in a fight. If the shorter fighter uses the allout style, the taller fighter's benefit from height is added all to speed and none to agility. If the taller fighter uses the inside style, his benefit from height is 25% added to speed and agility instead of 50%. If the taller fighter uses the outside style, his benefit from height is 75% added to speed and agility instead of 50%. Please refer to the descriptions of each of these styles in help for more information.

Units of height
Height is determined when a fighter is created by assigning points from the original 53 points that are used for all five abilities. One point of height is equivalent to 1", with a starting point of five foot, two inches tall. Thus a 5'2" tall fighter has a height of zero, and a 5'8" tall fighter has a height of 6. It is possible for a height to be negative. A negative height will add additional points to the original 53 points to be used for the other abilities.

The minimum height possible is 4'10" tall, a height of negative 4. The maximum height possible is 6'9" tall, a height of 19. There are still some old fighters in the game that may be somewhat shorter or taller than these limits, but all newly created fighters will follow this rule.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Weight

Every fighter can lose up to 5% of his body weight to make a weight limit without penalty. This is the fighter's minimum safe weight. For example, a 200 pound fighter has a minimum safe weight of 190 pounds, and a 150 pound fighter has a minimum safe weight of 142.5 pounds.

If a fighter must lose more then 5% of his body weight to make the limit for his division, then he is weakened by excessive dieting and loses a certain number of endurance points before the bout begins. (Note: This happens automatically, without any action by the manager.) The number of endurance points lost is given by the following formula:

(1 - R*R) * normal endurance

Where R is the ratio of the division's weight limit to the fighter's minimum safe weight.

For example, suppose a fighter with a toughness of 11 weighs 200 pounds and fights in the Light-Heavyweight division, where the weight limit is 175 pounds. The fighter's minimum safe weight is 190 pounds, so R is 175/190, which is approximately 0.92. The fighter normally starts a fight with 110 endurance points, but in this case he starts the fight with approximately

0.92*0.92 * 110 = 93.1

endurance points.

Note that due to the effects of fatigue, this would effectively reduce the fighter's STR, SPD, and AGL to 93/110 = 84.5% of their normal values at the start of the bout.

The effect of making weight is temporary and lasts only for one bout. The fighter immediately regains his full endurance if he moves to a higher weight division.

Also note that when a fighter loses weight to make a division, his weight for that bout (for purposes of modifying STR) is the maximum weight allowed in that division, not his usual weight. Thus, a fighter who weighs 200 pounds fighting in the Cruiserweight division would get no STR advantage from weight over a 190 pound fighter fighting in the Cruiserweight division.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Toughness


The toughness ability is used to simulate both the ability of a fighter to take a punch, and his stamina. Tougher fighters will be able to throw more punches for more rounds, and will be able to sustain more damage before being knocked down.

Effects of toughness
Endurance is calculated by multiplying toughness times ten. Since each aggressiveness used in a fight subtracts one point from your endurance, a high toughness is desirable for throwing a high punch count throughout a fight. Also, the damage your fighter receives is subtracted from your endurance each round, making a high toughness even more desirable. Please refer to the description of endurance in help for more information.

Toughness also directly affects the likelihood that your fighter will be knocked down. A change in toughness is directly proportional to the amount of damage required to knockdown your fighter. The exact amount of damage to be knocked down is also modified by whether your opponent is going to the head, going to the body, or fighting opportunistically. Please refer to the descriptions of the head, body, and opportunistic modifiers in help for more information.

Aging
Toughness also factors into the ability of a fighter to age well. Injury Points(IPs) are determined according to the age of the fighter, but always based upon: (Damage Received)-(Tgh*X)= # of IPs. X is a numeric value based upon the number of fights that your fighter has been involved in and X will decrease over time to simulate fighter aging.(see help topic: The Effects of Aging)

Effects of styles on toughness
Styles have no effect on toughness, and no comparison is made between fighters.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Agility

Agility is an important attribute of a successful fighter. The higher the agility, the less damage you will take and the fewer punches your opponent will land. There are many styles of fighting that you can utilize to gain additional agility. There are also styles of fighting your opponent can use to reduce your agility.

Benefits of agility
The damage you receive is reduced according to your agility. The greater your agility, the less damage you will receive, the less your agility the more damage you will receive. This change in damage is directly proportional to a change in agility. If your agility increases 10%, you will receive 10% less damage.

This proportionality means that the lower your agility, the greater an effect adding additional agility will have on reducing the damage you receive. Changing from an agility of 10 to an agility of 11 represents the same reduction in damage received as changing from an agility of 20 to an agility of 22.

Your agility also affects the number of punches your opponent will land. The higher your agility the fewer punches your opponent will land, the less you agility the more punches your opponent will land. This change in punches landed is not in direct proportion to a change in agility.

Large changes in agility may correspond to a large or small change in punches landed. This relationship is affected not only by your agility, but also by your opponent's speed, both fighters' styles, and your defense. Additionally, the number of punches landed is limited by the aggressiveness used. Please refer to the descriptions of each item in help to find out more.

Effects of styles on agility
Additional agility may be gained in the ring by using the outside, clinch, ring, or counter styles. Please refer to each of the style descriptions in help to find out more as the potential increase in agility is dependent on the particular match up in the ring.

Your agility may be reduced if your opponent uses the chase style or the counter style. It also may also be reduced while you are using the counter style. Your agility will be reduced while using the inside style. Please refer to each of the style descriptions in help to find out more as the potential decrease in agility is dependent on the particular match up in the ring.

Effects of height on agility
Your height compared to your opponent's height also can affect agility. The taller fighter will gain a bonus to agility that varies according to the style of fighting used by each fighter. If your opponent uses the allout style, you will receive no bonus to your agility from height. If you use the inside style, then you will receive a reduced bonus from being taller. Please refer to the height description in help for more information.

Styles that benefit from agility
The ring and chase styles benefit from having a higher agility than your opponent. The greater the difference in agilities, the greater the benefit from using either style. All other styles are unaffected by your agility.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Strength

Strength is one of the most important factors in the game. It can be used as an offensive weapon and factors heavily in the amount of damage you do to your opponent. It can also be used as a defensive weapon when using the "clinch" fighting style. Increases in strength make your weight go up and decreases in strength make your weight go down.

Best styles for very strong fighters

  • Clinch
  • Inside

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Speed

In real life boxing the ability to hit an opponent is determined by your hand speed, your reaction time, and your skill. All three of these are quantified in the speed ability in the boxing game. More speed equals more punches landed. Speed also adds to the power of a punch. Comparing two equally strong fighters, the speedier fighter's punches will do more damage.

Benefits of speed
Speed is absolutely essential to winning. If your speed is too low, you will not be able to win the rounds on score, and if it is too low you will not be able to do enough damage. Even a super-slugger type needs some speed to be able to damage his opponent effectively. Dancers and boxers need even more speed to be able to effectively outland their opponents during a match. As the ranking of a fighter increases, the need for more speed becomes even greater.

More speed is not always a good thing though. There is a limit on the number of punches landed which is equal to the number of punches thrown. More speed than needed to reach this point is a waste. The greater the adjusted agility of your opponent, the fewer punches you will land, and thus the greater the speed needed to be able to land the same percentage of punches. The same holds true for when your opponent uses a higher defense. So a balance between your speed and your future opponent's agility is needed.

Effects of styles on speed
The feint style will add to your speed. Please refer to the description of the feint style in help for more information, as the potential increase in agility is dependent on the particular match up in the ring.

There are no styles that can be used by you or your opponent that will reduce your speed.

Effects of height on speed
Height also adds to your speed. The effects of height are modified by the styles of both fighters, but generally the taller fighter will gain a boost in speed from being taller. If your opponent uses the allout style, all the increase your agility normally receives from height is added to your speed instead. If you use the inside style, then you will receive a reduced bonus from being taller. Please refer to the height description in help for more information.

Styles that benefit from speed
An advantage in speed increases the positive effects from using the counter style and the feint style. The greater the difference in speed, the greater the benefit from using either style. A disadvantage in speed increases the negative effects from using the counter style. Please refer to the descriptions of each of these styles in help for more information.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

The Effects of Aging

Just like in real life, The Boxing Game fighters get old and their skills deteriorate. The effects of this aging process are described below.

After 40 or more fights - All bonus ability points will always go to strength or toughness, i.e., you won't gain agility or speed unless you train specifically for it. This also means that your fighter will probably start gaining a little weight.

After 50 or more fights - all abilities earned through training and bonuses will go to strength or toughness. At this point your fighter will definitely start packing on the pounds (if you are winning).

After 60 or more fights - All abilities gained from training and winning will go to strength or toughness. At this point in a fighters career he will have a very difficult time staying competitive.

Injury points will also be affected in both positive and negative ways. New fighters, youthful and healthy will be less affected and older fighters will deteriorate more rapidly as follows...

 

0-10 fights IP = Total Damage - (Toughness * 5) New fighters break
11-40 fights IP = Total Damage - (Toughness * 4) bulk of career
41-60 fights IP = Total Damage - (Toughness * 3) veteran
61-70 fights IP = Total Damage - (Toughness * 2) cagey old fighter
71+ fights IP = Total Damage - Toughness walking corpse

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Fighter Retirement

If you feel that your fighter has had a bad month or you're just sick of his constant complaining you can Retire him.

To do this simply open your fighter's page & click on the lovely silver button that has the word Retire on it (Makes sense huh...).

At this point you will be warned that it may take over a week before your fighter gets another fight once you Unretire him.
This is to prevent unscrupulous managers dodging fights that don't suit them.

Please note that if your fighter has a fight scheduled he will NOT be retired until after this fight has been run.

To Unretire your fighter at a later date simply open up his page & click on the other silver button called Unretire. Your fighter will then be scheduled a bout AFTER the next round of scheduled fights in your division has been run.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Auto Retirement of fighters

Fighters will be retired automatically under the following circumstances:

  1. The fighter has lost at least once and he has no fight plan or an empty fight plan
  2. The fighter lost his last fight, has a winning percentage of .500 or less and has a fight plan that is over 3 weeks old
  3. The manager's account is suspended or closed
  4. The managers status switches from member to guest. The manager will then be able to reactivate up to 5 fighters

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Making a comeback

Your fighter can return to the game at any time in his career. There is a restriction on when exactly he can enter the rankings again.

In order to minimize fight picking fighters can only make a comeback after the scheduler for their weight division is finished running. Currently that is less than 3 days before the fights run.

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

Dumping A Fighter

If you have a fighter that just isn't doing well you can dump him. This removes him from your gym permanently. Once you dump a fighter he can be purchased at auction by another manager with all proceeds going to the game.

 

 

FIGHTER HELP INDEX

 

As you read through this help file it may be helpful to open up the Sparring Partner so that you can experiment with some of the examples to get a better idea of how they work.  Simply copy and paste the related example you would like to experiment with into the strategy field in the Sparring Partner and use the "Fight" button to read the results.  Try different examples against one another, and experiment with different fighter stats to get a better idea of how different fighters use different fight plans.

 

Fight Plan Help

 

Index

 

Fight Plan Options

 

Head Shots

 

Body Blows

 

Damage

 

Effects of Injuries

 

Fighting

 

Inside

 

Ring

 

Chase or Corner

 

CLinch

 

Outside

 

Counter

 

Feint

 

Allout

 

Fighting Dirty

 

The Round Variable

 

The Hiscuts Variable

 

The MyCuts Variable

 

The Opponent Variable

 

The Score Variable

 

The Warnings Variable

 

The Endurance Variable

 

Fight Plan Examples

 

 

Fight Plan Options

There are various options you can use to add more detail to your fighter's instructions.

You have 20 energy points to allocate for the parameters that will represent a boxers aggressiveness, power and defense. The parameters consist of three numbers with this format:

#/#/#

#+#+# = 20 energy points

The first number indicates the amount of punches being thrown or aggressiveness. (each energy point used will be approximately 8 punches thrown)

The second number indicates the amount of power or strength being used.

The third number indicates the amount of defense your fighter is using in the ring.

 

aggressiveness/power/defense

 

Examples:

 

5/5/10 - Fighter is throwing even hard punches while defending himself well.  This set of parameters would indicate that the fighter is looking to win rounds while causing some damage to his opponent, protecting himself at the same time.

 

4/12/4 - Fighter is throwing few and very hard punches while only defending himself very little.  This would represent a fighter that is looking for the KO or trying to cause a great deal of injury to his opponent, but not trying to win the round by punch count and leaving himself wide open to receive damage.

 

7/1/12 - Fighter is jabbing a high volume of punches that are not hard but he is defending himself very well.  He is definitely trying to win the rounds by punch count while defending himself from injury and damage, but isn't inflicting any damage or injury to his opponent. 

 

Every energy point you do not use is considered resting.  Be careful when you do rest to protect your fighter with greater defense, but resting can allow your fighter to outlast his opponent in endurance for the end game of the fight.

 

Example:

1/1/14 (ring) (resting 4)

1/1/10 (clinch) (resting 8)


Next, you can indicate that you would like to throw head punches during a certain round by putting an H or h after the aggressiveness number, as in:

10H/5/5

or

10h/5/5

Similarly, you can indicate that you would like to throw body blows by using a B or b:
5B/5/10

or

5b/5/10

 

If you don't use a B or an H in a given round, then your fighter will box opportunistically for that round and land more punches.

 

 

A Fight Plan consists of a set or series of parameters that may include variables and conditionals.  Each round is represented by using the round number followed by a parentheses.

1) - represents round 1

2) - represents round 2

10) - represents round 10

 

This allows you to change the parameters and style of your fighter so that he can adjust to the conditions of the fight.

 

Example 1:

1) 5B/5/10
3) 6B/7/7
8) 7H/8/5


In the above strategy, the fighter is throwing body blows for the first seven rounds while throwing more and harder after the second round and then switching to head punches from the eighth to twelfth round.  As the fight resolver reads the fight plan from the bottom up at the beginning of every round it will find the next correct statement within the fight plan to use.  In the twelfth round, the next correct statement is 8) 7H/8/5, so in the twelfth round the fighter would throw 7H/8/5. 

 

Example 2 with variables:
1) 8/1/11 (ring)
3) 1/1/18 (ring)
3) if score <=1 then 8/1/11 (ring)  

 

In this example the fighter throws a high volume of punches from the first to second round trying to win the rounds by decision.  In round three if the score is less than or equal 1 then the fighter will throw 8/1/11, but if the score is greater than 1 then the next correct statement would be 3) 1/1/18, in which the fighter would not throw hardly any punches while trying to protect himself very well.  This FP would be an example for use with a dancer type fighter, where the fighter has little strength but a great deal of agility and is looking to win fights by mainly decision.

 

Example 3 with variables:
1) 4h/12/4 (clinch)
2) 4b/12/4 (clinch)

12) 4h/12/4 (inside)

2) if opp=tired then 5h/10/5 (allout)

 

In this example the fighter comes out in the first round throwing hard to the head looking to cause injuries using the clinch style.  The last statement of this FP equals if the round is 2 or greater and the opponent is tired then 5h/10/5 (allout) and if this is true to the fight resolver for the second round or on then the fighter will throw 5h/10/5 (allout), however if this is not true then the next correct statement would be 2) 4b/12/4 (clinch), in which case the fighter would throw 4b/12/4 (clinch), going hard to the body using the clinching style of fighting.  This would continue threw every round until or if the last statement 2) if opp=tired then 5h/10/5 (allout) becomes true to the fight resolver when it starts its search for the first true statement as it reads the FP from the bottom up.  If this statement isn't true for the twelfth round then the fight resolver will use the next correct statement 12) 4h/12/4 (inside), in which the fighter would come out in the twelfth round fighting inside and throwing hard to the head.  This FP would be an example of a slugger or strong fighter against a dancer type fighter.

 

Fighting Styles


You may choose one of the following fighting styles for your fighter:
Fighting - The basic fighting style.

 

Inside - The fighter moves in close to throw powerful uppercuts and hooks.


Clinch - The fighter holds his opponent to avoid being hit and to bring him closer to land body blows.


Feint - The fighter tries to fake out his opponent to land more blows.


Counter - A fast fighter uses his speed for defense, as well as offense.


Ring - The fighter defends himself using movement and footwork.


Chase or Corner - The fighter uses his agility advantage to corner his opponent.


Outside - The fighter stays away from his opponent using jabs and tries to tie up his opponent whenever he attacks at close range.


Allout To inflict damage or score a KO the fighter ignores his opponent's counter-attacks and just hits.



A fighting style can be indicated by putting a keyword in parentheses next to the instruction.  Using no keyword will result in the boxer using the Fighting style, as in the following examples:
5/5/10 = comes out fighting

6B/7/7 (inside) = fighting inside
5/10/5 (clinch) = clinching opponent
7H/8/5 (feint) = feinting against opponent

15/1/4 (ring) = using the ring

6/6/8 (chase) or (corner) = chase or corner the opponent

3h/10/7 (outside) = fighting outside

4h/12/4 (allout) = going all out on the opponent

Your fighter may choose to Fight Dirty in any given round. This is indicated by an ! after the power number. For example:
1) 5/5/10 (counter)
7) 6/7!/7 (feint)
8) 7H/8!/5 (inside)
This fighter fights dirty starting with round 7.

Variables

You can also chose different types of variables in your fight plan. Variables are additional things you can add to your FP's to give them more depth and accuracy.

The Round Variable - allows you to depict a bracket of rounds or to choose greater than or less than certain rounds.

 

The Hiscuts Variable - allows you to gauge your opponents fighter's injuries.

 

The MyCuts Variable - allows you to gauge your own fighter's injuries.

 

The Opponent Variable - gauges your opponents fighter's endurance.

 

The Score Variable - depicts your corner's scoring of the fight, whether your fighter is ahead or behind in the score cards.

 

The Warnings Variable - allows you to keep track of the amount of warnings the referee has issued your fighter.

 

The Endurance Variable - it allows you keep accurate track of your fighter's endurance during the fight.

 

 

Using these variables in combination to create variable equations and conditionals will add even greater depth to your FP's.

 

Example 1:

2) if hiscuts > mycuts then 5h/10/5 (inside)

This would mean if hiscuts are greater than mycuts then 5h/10/5 (inside)

This example would be a conditional that would be used if you wanted your fighter to take advantage of his opponent's injuries. 

 

Example 2:

3) if score <=1 and end >=90 then 9/1/10 (outside)

This would mean if score is less than or equal 1 and endurance is greater than or equal to 90 then 9/1/10 (outside)

This example would be representative of a conditional that might be found in a dancer type fighter's FP, who looks to win fights by decisions.

 

Example 3:

10) if opp = hurt and end >= 140*0.69 and mycuts = 0 then 4h/12!/4 (allout)

This would mean if opponent equals hurt and endurance is greater than or equal than 69% of 140(starting endurance) and mycuts equal 0 then 4h/12!/4 (allout)

This example represents a conditional in a fight plan that is looking to see if the opponent is hurt and if the fighter has enough endurance and no injuries to go for the KO, and maybe throw in some head butts or elbows to accomplish it.

 

Example 4:

9) if end >=140-(round-1)*10 and score <=-2 then 6/6/8 (ring)

This would mean if endurance is greater than or equal 10 damage received in the previous round from 140(starting endurance) and score is less than or equal to negative 2(losing by 2 points) then 6/6/8 (ring)

In this example the conditional is seeing how much damage was done in the previous round and if the fighter is losing by 2 points.

 

Experimenting with variable equations will develop your own basis for your favorite conditionals to add to your fight plans.  For further reading on other variable equations and conditionals check out the Strategy forum.

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

Head Shots (The H or h Modifier)

Description:
A fighter may choose to throw punches primarily to their opponent's head in any given round by simply adding the letter H after the aggression energy point allocation number. This means your fighter will specifically target the head region of your opponent in an attempt to open up cuts or increase the chance of a knockdown. It can be used in combination with the Fighting Dirty (!) modifier, but not the Body Blows (B) fight style modifier. When no modifier is used in this position your fighter will box opportunistically, throwing a combination of punches, including head shots and body blows.

Example:
5H/10/5 (inside)

or

5h/10/5 (inside)

Advantages:
Throwing head punches increases the chance of knockdowns and knockouts. It also helps to create and aggravate cuts and injuries to your opponent.

Disadvantages:
By throwing punches primarily to the head, the percentage of your fighter's punches landed is lowered. Long-term fight damage to your opponent is also decreased using this modifier.

Who should use this fight modifier:

  • A fighter that wishes to try and Knock Down or Knock Out his opponent, used in those rounds in which a KD/KO is desired.
  • Slugger type fighters in the later rounds of a bout.
  • A fighter whose opponent is hurt.
  • A fighter whose opponent is close to a TKO because of fight injuries.
  • A fighter who has a decent amount of strength and whose opponent always goes (allout) in a particular round.

Who should NOT use this fight modifier:

  • A fighter who is trying to maximize the number of punches landed, to win the round primarily by decision.
  • A fighter who is trying to maximize the amount of damage done to an opponent.
  • A fighter with very little ability points allocated to strength.
  • A fighter using very little power energy points in their fight line.

 

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Body Blows (The B or b Modifier)

Description:
Maximizes the long-term damage (i.e. loss of endurance points) inflicted, but minimizes the chance of scoring a knockdown or knockout.

A fighter may choose to throw punches primarily to their opponent's body in any given round by simply adding the letter B after the aggression energy point allocation number. This means your fighter will specifically target the stomach and chest regions of your opponent in an attempt to make their opponent tired faster and increase the amount of damage done in the rounds that it is used. It can be used in combination with the Fighting Dirty (!) modifier, but not the Head Shots (H) fight style modifier. When no modifier is used in this position your fighter will box opportunistically, throwing a combination of punches, including head shots and body blows.

Example:
3B/12/5 (clinch)

or

3b/12/5 (clinch) 

Advantages:
Throwing Body Blows increases the long-term fight damage to your opponent, which in turn will wear them down faster.

Disadvantages:
By throwing punches primarily to the body, the percentage of your fighter's punches landed is lowered. Also chances of scoring a Knock Down or Knock Out are decreased in the rounds this modifier is used.

Who should use this fight modifier:

  • Fighters with med-to-high strength ability points, used in the early rounds of a fight to wear down an opponent for an eventual KO attempt.
  • Fighters wishing to maximize the amount of long-term fight damage to an opponent.

Who should NOT use this fight modifier:

  • Fighters who have med-to-low speed ability points, and are trying to win rounds by points.
  • Fighters wishing to maximize the number of punches landed on their opponents.
  • In the round that a fighter wishes to try and Knock Down or Knock Out their opponent.

 

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Damage

Damage is factored into round scoring. Every point of damage you give to your opponent in a round is the equivalent of a certain amount of punches landed. Be careful though; not all judges are the same and some will be more impressed with the damage you inflict than others.

 

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When.

Injuries are inflicted on a fighter in the course of a Bout and come in various types. Injuries are measured in injury levels starting at 1 and going up to 4 (4 being the most serious)

Why.

You will usually pick up injuries when punching to the head and having a low defense, this exposes your head to your opponent and a fighter with better strength and remaining endurance will cause significant damage. Punching to the head is best used when your opponent is weakening, or if you feel you have a distinct speed advantage and think you can take the fight very quickly. High Defense and Agility will mean less damage

Effect.

The following details the different kinds of injuries and their effect.

Bleeding above or below an eye: A bleeding injury is called a minor cut, a cut, a serious cut, or a gash according to the level of the injury. A cut causes a fighter to sustain one point of damage for every level of injury.

A cut over the eye also interferes with a fighter's vision. This causes the fighter to lose points of Speed for every level of injury. In addition, a serious cut over the eye causes the fighter to lose points of Agility, and a gash over the eye causes the fighter to lose further points of Agility.

  Swelling above an eye. Swelling always starts at level 1, but every time it is aggravated the level of swelling increases. At level 4 the eye is said to have swollen shut and cannot be swollen further. If both a fighter's eyes are swollen shut the fighter loses by TKO. Swelling can seriously interfere with a fighter's vision. Starting with level 2, each level of swelling causes the fighter to lose points of Speed and Agility.
  Injured nose. A level 1 injury is a bloody nose, a level 2 or 3 injury is a fractured nose, and a level 4 injury is a broken nose. For a level 2 or greater injury, the fighter sustains ext damage for each level of injury. At any level, the fighter fatigues an extra 1 point per round to reflect the fact that he cannot breathe properly.   Injured jaw. Level 1, 2, and 3 injuries to the jaw are reported as "bloody lip", "bloody mouth", and "broken tooth", but they have no effect. They are just there for "color." However, a level 4 injury is said to be a broken jaw. A broken jaw is a serious and painful injury -- the fighter immediately sustains a large amount of damage. If this injury is aggravated, the fight is stopped and the injured fighter loses by TKO.

Other Notes.

Changes to SPD and AGL due to injury do not take effect until the following round. Also, no ability is ever reduced below 1.

When an injury is aggravated, there is a 50% chance that it will be "promoted" to a level 2, 3, or 4 injury. Level 1 injuries are promoted to level 2 2/3 of the time an to level 3 2/9 of the time, and to level 4 1/9 of the time. Level 2 injuries are promoted to level 3 2/3 of the time and to level 4 1/3 of the time. Level 3 injuries are promoted to level 4.

When an injury is aggravated, any damage caused by that injury is repeated. For example a level 1 cut, if aggravated, causes one additional point of damage. If promoted to level 2, it would cause 2 additional points of damage.

If an injury is at level 3 or 4 and a total of 7 or more points of damage have been caused by that injury, the fight is stopped by the doctor and the injured fighter loses by TKO. The fight is also stopped by the doctor if the injury is at level 4 and a total of 6 or more points of damage have been caused.

 

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Fighting

The Fighting style is mainly used when you and your opponent may be equal in weight and height, or it is a style to be used when you fight with a slugger against an equal slugger, or if you’re not sure what to do in certain situations. 

Example:

5h/5/10

 

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Inside

The Inside fighting style is one of the more commonly used styles by very strong fighters known as sluggers or by a fighter with a strength advantage that is attempting to do more serious damage to an opponent.

Essentially, the Inside fighting style means that you walk in as close as you can to your opponent and begin hammering away with power shots such as uppercuts, hooks, powerful overhands, and swings (though not as wild as allout swings). Going Inside allows your fighter to do much more damage than he would be capable of if he was fighting natural. Unfortunately for the Inside fighter, hammering away with power shots leaves you standing in the same spot or same relative position to your opponent for too long. That situation creates a penalty against your fighter's agility. The original penalty for using the inside style was 15%, but the fight resolver is no longer the same. Since the resolver is different, the 15% is not completely accurate, but because of game balances issues 15% is not far off the mark.

Advantages:
Increases Strength by 1.5
Increased Strength is based on your Str advantage over opponent, so a weak opponent gives this style much more power.

Strength advantage over weaker opponent is increased by 50%.

Disadvantages:
Height Bonus is reduced by about 1/2
Agility is reduced by 15% because of the lack of motion.

Example:

5h/5/10 (inside)

 

 

 

 

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Ring

 

A fighter using the ring is basically trying to use his footwork to avoid his opponents punches and at the same time create openings through which to attack. Dancers can benefit from using ring as it will reduce the amount of hits they take. At the same time though nimble sluggers can use this to their advantage to run around slower sluggers and try and take them out while fighting defensively.
 

Advantages:

Agility is increased by 1.5

Agility advantage increased by 50%

 

Disadvantages:

Strength is decreased by 15%


Example:
4/8/8 (ring)

 

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Chase or Corner

Chase or Corner should be used only by fighters with an agility advantage over their opponent. Unlike ring, Chase can be used effectively with a small agility advantage. The bonuses for using Chase take place prior to any adjustments stemming from Height. Chase reduces your opponents agility (provided that you have an agility advantage) by continually trying to force them into a corner. The disadvantage to such a style is that since you are being the aggressor your endurance suffers from the added effort needed to force your opponent into the corners. The Chase style has two primary uses:
1) To lower a stronger slugger's agility and thereby hit him harder.
2) As a dancer: to turn and face a stronger opponent's allout in hopes of knocking him out.

Advantages:

The opponent's agility is reduced by your fighter's agility advantage by a maximum of 10% of their agility.

 

Disadvantages:

There is a .25 points of endurance lost for every aggression point.

 

Example:

4/8/8(chase)
or
4/8/8(corner)

Either use will bring about the same style.

 

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Clinch

Clinch is the sluggers favorite fight plan, it causes an opponent's mobility to be decreased as he is being held, it increases the fighters defense as they are up close and harder to hit with solid punches and allows the fighter to use his weight and strength to "lean" on their opposition and wear them down. Powerful sluggers can end a fight in the clinch before having to take any risks. While clinching one point of aggression is lost and considered to be used for resting. While clinching, if a fighter has a defense of 10 or more, they can be penalized for holding and if called up too often can lose a point.
 

Advantages:

If the opponent is weaker then your fighter then 50% of that strength advantage is added to agility.

 

Disadvantages:

One aggression energy point automatically goes to resting.

 

Example:

5h/10/5 (clinch)

Results in:

4h/10/5 (clinch) (1 resting)

 

If your fighter is more agile than opponent then using clinch will have a 50% agility advantage loss.

If taller than your opponent then your height advantage will be halved.

If you use more than 10 energy points while using clinch, your fighter could be penalized for not breaking the clinch.


Example:
4b/8/8 (clinch)

 

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Outside

If a taller fighter uses this style, his height advantage is increased by 50%. Note that this increases both his SPD and his AGL. However, the fighter's STR is decreased by 15%, since he is throwing more jabs and fewer upper cuts and hooks. Sample use: 4h/8/8 (outside) Advantages: When a fighter who is taller than his opponent uses the outside style he maximizes any height advantage he has by staying on the outside and utilizing his superior reach to jab his opponent. This translates to landing more punches on his opponent while receiving less damage himself.

Additionally if he is facing a stronger opponent who is clinching or fighting on the inside, fighting outside will lessen the advantages his stronger opponent is enjoying.

Advantages:

A taller fighter has his height advantage increased by 50%

 

Disadvantages:

Strength is decreased by 15%.

When fighting outside since you are throwing few power shots your effective strength is reduced by a small amount.

When using outside against allout all the height bonus goes to speed.

Who should use the style:

Fighters who feel that their only advantage over their opponent is in height should use this style. Unless you are a very experienced manager you should consider this style for trying to win primarily by decision.

Who should NOT use this style:

Fighters who are shorter than their opponent or only marginally taller with a more significant advantage in some other ability should not use this style.

How to defeat someone who is using this style:

  • If you are stronger with good agility and/or toughness use (inside).
  • If you are stronger with ok agility and/or toughness use (clinch).
  • If you are stronger with poor agility and/or toughness use (clinch) and throw headshots to try and score a quick KO. Sometimes a surprise (allout) might work but this is a very risky strategy and only to be used if you really think you can't win.
  • If you are considerably faster, consider using (counter).
  • If you are more agile consider using (ring).

Generally, extremely tall fighters are distance fighters looking to win by decision. Try to pound them to the body and fatigue them in the early rounds before attempting a late round KO.

Example:

7/1/12 (outside)

 

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

 

Counter

Counter Punch should only be used by fast fighters and even then it should not be relied on as a solution to every round of a fight. If opposition see that you always use counter they will start to lower their punch count and up the power in order to reduce your effectiveness.

When using Counter punch it is important to remember that you cannot throw more punches than your opposition, in fact your aggression is lowered a point of aggression below your opponent's (but never below 1).

So if you use:

4/8/8 (counter)

but your opposition uses:

2/8/10

 

then you will actually fight 1/8/8 (counter) and the 3 other points will be used for resting. Fast sluggers and dancers looking for an offensive option in the late rounds can all benefit from counter attack if it's used well. Using counter attack against a faster opponent is not a wise plan.

 

Advantages:

If your fighter has greater speed than your opponent then your fighter will have a 25% speed advantage added to his agility as your fighter's opponent will have 25% speed advantage subtracted from his agility.

 

Disadvantages:

One aggression energy point automatically goes to resting.

 

Example:

7h/3/10 (counter)

Results in:

6h/3/10 (counter) (1 resting)

 

If both fighters use counter then both will have aggression energy point go to resting.

If your fighter has less speed than his opponent then he receives a 50% speed disadvantage that is subtracted from his agility.

 

Example:

5b/10/5 (counter)

 

 

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Feint

 

A fighter using the feint is trying to fool his opponent into defending punches that aren't thrown and therefore open up his defense for the real shot. As a result the attacker's speed is increased to take into account the defenders being fooled occasionally by the feinting. However one point of aggression is used to throw the feinting non-contact blows. Feinting is useful if you are fairly fast but not overly strong fighting against an aggressive slugger. It is also useful in a slap fest where you think the extra speed gained from feinting will result in more blows landed than the 8 sacrificed to feint.
 

Advantages:

Speed of your fighter will be increased by 1.5

The speed advantage of your fighter over a slower opponent will be increased by 50%.

 

Disadvantages:

One aggression energy point automatically goes to resting.

 

Example:

6/6/8 (feint)

Results In:

5/6/8 (feint) (resting 1)


Example:
4h/4/12 (feint)

 

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index
 

Allout

When a fighter uses this style, the damage he inflicts is doubled, but the damage inflicted on him is quadrupled. In addition, if he is shorter than his opponent, his opponent's entire HGT advantage is added to SPD rather than being split between SPD and AGL.

There are times when throwing normal punches isn't enough and where a fighter needs to give 200%, or perhaps doesn't "need" to but feels that it might be a good surprise tactic. All Out basically means that the fighter drops his defense and rushes head long at his opponent throwing wild punches and putting every ounce of energy he has into them. As a result the damage he causes is double, however the damage he receives is quadrupled. All Out is best used against weak slappers/dancers, severely battered fighters or very early on as a surprise tactic if you feel that all other options are of no use. Adding a bit of dirty fighting to an allout often works wonders where sanity and planning have failed.

Advantages:

Damage to opponent doubled.

 

Disadvantages:

Damage to your own fighter is quadrupled.

The height advantage of your fighter is halved.

Example:
4/8/8 (allout)

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

Fighting Dirty

(The ! Modifier)

Description:
A fighter may choose to fight dirty in any given round by simply adding the exclamation point symbol, !, after the power energy point allocation number. This means intentionally throwing illegal punches and moves, such as head-butts, low blows, kidney punches, and of course, the ever infamous bite to the ear. It can be used in combination with any fight style, and the Head Shots (H) or Body Blows (B) fight style modifiers.

Example:
4H/10!/6 (allout)

Advantages:
Throwing illegal punches and moves increases the damage inflicted to your opponent, thus increasing the chance of injury, knocking down, and even possibly knocking out your opponent.

Disadvantages:
You risk being penalized (round/points) or disqualified (losing the bout entirely) by the referee. The more warnings you receive from the referee the more of a chance you have to lose the match by disqualification.

Who should use this fight modifier:

  • Fighters who are primarily going for the win by KO or TKO and haven't been warned by the referee.
  • Fighters who are trying to maximize damage on their opponent and haven't been warned by the referee.
  • Fighters that possess high strength ability points, allocate high energy points to power in their strategy, and are going for an early round KO.
  • Fighters that are so far behind in points that they need a KO or TKO to win, and the chance of being disqualified is no longer a concern.
  • Fighters that wish to get disqualified in order to end the fight. Beware, throwing a fight by using something similar to 1/1!/1 (allout) in the early rounds may be interpreted as Fight Fixing by the Commission and get the manager suspended, and in the future will definitely affect a fighter's charisma. This last option is not recommended.


Who should NOT use this fight modifier:

  • Fighters who are primarily going for the win by decision.
  • Fighters where damage inflicted upon opponent is not a concern.
  • Fighters that do not have the ability to inflict a good amount of damage on their opponent (even when using high power) because of a low amount of strength ability points.
  • Fighters that have the fight in the bag (i.e. When a fighter is winning by more points than their opponent can make up in the number of remaining rounds).

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

The Round Variable

The round variable is used to determine what round it is in the fight.

The following two strategies are identical:

Fight Plan #1:
1) 7/7/6
5) 4/8/8

Fight Plan #2:
7/7/6
if round >=5 then 4/8/8

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

The Hiscuts Variable

Hiscuts is a conditional used in fight plans to track injuries to your opponent. Injuries are not included in the endurance numbers. Examples of injuries are:
swelling around the eyes
cuts or damage to the nose or jaw.

Each of the injuries is separate and can be aggravated
eg you may have cuts or swelling in several different
places.

There are 3 levels of damage:
1. Swelling around the eye.
Cut under/above the eye.
Bloody lip.

2. Eye almost swollen shut.
Gash under/above the eye.
Broken tooth.

3. Eye swollen shut.
Severe gash under/above the eye.
Broken Jaw.

When the damage level reaches 4 the fight is stopped on a TKO. This happens after the round has been completed.

The conditional is added to your fight plan like this:

3) if hiscuts > 2 then 3h/7/10 (counter)
Going to the head will allow you to target hiscuts for more damage.

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

The MyCuts Variable

mycuts is a conditional used in fight plans to track injuries to your fighter. Injuries are not included in the endurance numbers. Examples of injuries are:
swelling around the eyes
cuts or damage to the nose or jaw.

Each of the injuries is separate and can be aggravated eg you may have cuts or swelling in several different places.

There are 3 levels of damage:
1. Swelling around the eye.
Cut under/above the eye.
Bloody lip.

2. Eye almost swollen shut.
Gash under/above the eye.
Broken tooth.

3. Eye swollen shut.
Severe gash under/above the eye.
Broken Jaw.

When the damage level reaches 4 the fight is stopped on a TKO. This happens after the round has been completed.

The conditional is added to your fight plan like this:

3) if mycuts > 2 then 1/1/18 (ring)
You want to protect your fighter against more injury.

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

The Opponent Variable

This variable is when you base it on your opponent's endurance. This is not the same as the Endurance variable. 

 

if opponent = hurt then 5H/11/4 (inside)

or

if opp = hurt then 5h/11/4 (inside)

 

hurt - This means your opponent has about very little endurance left so you may want to go for the KO.

(hurt = less than 33% of starting endurance)

if opp = hurt then 5h/11/4 (inside)

or

weak - This means your opponent has about very little endurance left so you may want to go for the KO.

(weak = less than 33% of starting endurance)

if opp = weak then 5h/10/5 (allout)

 

tired - This means that your opponent is tired and you are less vulnerable so close in and bang him around so he can't recover.

(tired = between 66% and 33% of starting endurance)

if opp = tired then 4B/8/8 (inside)

You should also check out The Hiscuts Variable.

 

 

strong - This means that your opponent still has a lot of endurance left so you may want to shoot for decisions in the rounds or go to the body more to take away more of his endurance.

(strong = maintaining 66% of starting endurance)

if opp = strong then 5h/5/10

 

It is important as the fight progresses to gauge your opponent's condition and add conditionals as needed. Something along the line of:

1) 5/5/10 (counter)
3) if opp is strong then 4B/8/8 (clinch)
if opp is tired then 5H/9/6 (inside)
if opp is hurt then 6H/9/5 (allout)

 

 

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

 

The Score Variable

The premise of the score variable is simple. It is used to determine whether you are winning or losing and by how much.

Keep in mind that your fighter is too busy trying to keep his head from being separated from his shoulders to keep track of the score so he relies on his corner, who well....has good days and bad days. Some days he's Manny Steward, some days he's Rocky Balboa's drunken brother-in-law.

Before each round you ask your corner what he thinks the score is and he'll give you a number to indicate by how many points you are winning or losing. A negative number indicates you are losing whereas a positive number indicates you are winning. If your corner tells you that the score is 0 he either thinks the fight is even or is too busy flirting with the round card girls to pay much attention.

Remember to allow for a margin of error when asking your corner the score. The only guaranteed way to win a fight that you seem to have well in hand is to knock the other guy out!

Just the same, if you intend to use the score variable here are some samples.
Note: These examples are kept very simple for illustration purposes. Complex variables and advanced strategy creation will be covered in a separate document.

12) if score < 1 then 4H/8/8 (allout)
This piece of strategy says "in round 12 if my corner doesn't think I'm ahead go nuts and try to knock out the other guy with little regard for my own safety."

8) if score > 6 then 1/1/18 (ring)
This piece of strategy says "in round 8 if my corner says I'm more than 6 points ahead and probably can't lose then run away and go into an ultra defensive mode to avoid getting hurt."

1) 5/5/10 (counter)
3) if score >= 2 then 5B/8/7 (clinch)
if score <= 1 then 10/1/9 (ring)
This means if your score is or greater than 2 ahead of your opponent, you'll go 5B/8/7 (clinch). If it's less than or equal to 1, then you'll go 10/1/9. Beware of this variable, because the score variable is based on what your corner thinks the score is, which could be way off from what the real score is.

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

The Warnings Variable

If a fighter is fighting dirty in a round, there is a 50% chance he will be warned by a referee. The first time a fighter is warned there is a 10% chance he will be disqualified and lose the bout by a foul. The second warning, there is a 20% chance of disqualification, then 40%, then 80% and finally automatic DQ. After one warning a fighter has one point taken away from him even if he is not disqualified. There is a 1.5% chance that a fighter will be warned even if he is not fighting dirty. (This reflects the chance of unintentional fouls and bad refereeing) This warning is treated, as a normal warning except the fighter is never disqualified as a result of an unintentional foul. If a fighter is clinching and using a very high defense, there is a chance that he will be penalized for refusing to break a clinch. The probability that he will be penalized is computed by taking the square of his defense and dividing by 4. If a fighter is penalized and wins the round, then one point is added to his opponent's score. If a Fighter is penalized and either loses the round or the round is a tie, then one point is subtracted from his score.

Example:

2) 5h/10!/5 (inside)

2) if warn >=1 then 5h/10/5 (clinch)

 

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

 

The Endurance Variable

Starting Endurance:
Determined by multiplying a fighter's Toughness by 10. (Example: Fighter has a Toughness of 12 then that fighter starts with 120 endurance points) It can be written endurance or just end to make it simple.

Using Endurance in a fight plan:
Samples:
if end >= 120 then 4/8/8 (ring)
if end >= 120 - (round-1)*X then 4/8/8 (allout)

The first sample is the most basic and refers only to checking your actual endurance at the beginning of the round. The second sample is slightly more advanced and is generally used by sluggers that want to see how much damage is being done to them while they slug. Using the second sample, a manager would arrange the conditions line by line so that the line that would have the highest endurance would be last (i.e. X is the smallest).

Judging your own endurance:
As a manager, your job includes being acutely aware of how much endurance your fighter has and has been losing. In the fight reports, a fighter's condition is listed at the end of each round. Each level of lower condition is determined by a loss of 10% endurance from the fighter's starting endurance. At 66% of a fighter's starting endurance, that fighter becomes tired and at 33% of starting endurance, that fighter will become weak or hurt.

Your boxer can also use the endurance variable, which is based on how much endurance (10*TGH) he has left. An example of this is:
1) 5/5/10 (counter)
3) if end > 80 then 5H/9/6 (inside)
if end < 81 then 4B/8/8 (clinch)
In this case, if the boxer's endurance is greater than 80, then he'll go 5H/9/6 (inside) and if his endurance is less than 81, he'll go 4B/8/8 (clinch).

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

Fight Plan Examples

Note: It is important to remember that the fight resolver reads from the bottom up at the beginning of every round when resolving fight plans.

 

Example 1:

 

1) 6/6/7 (ring)
2) 7/6/6 (ring)
3) 5/6/9 (ring)
4) 1/1/15 (ring)
5) 5/7/8 (ring)
6) 5/5/10 (ring)
7) 1/1/15 (ring)
8) 1/1/15 (ring)
9) 5/7/8 (ring)
10) 6/4/10 (ring)
11) 2/2/16 (ring)
12) 2/1/17 (ring)

 

 

In this example, there are no variables or conditionals but the plan relies on out throwing the opponent while still causing damage.  In the first three rounds the fighter seeks the rounds by decision 1) 6/6/7 (ring), 2) 7/6/6 (ring), 3) 5/6/9 (ring), while still keeping the strength or power of the punches the same.  In the fourth round, the fighter looks to rest as it is presumed he is ahead, or tiring his opponent and looking to gain in the endurance game over his opponent 4) 1/1/15 (ring).  Still looking to retain the lead the next two rounds the fighter throws an average amount of punches, beginning with more power then defending himself more in the sixth round 5) 5/7/8 (ring), 6) 5/5/10 (ring).  Again looking to rest the fighter, the seventh and eighth round are reserved for resting the fighter 7) 1/1/15 (ring), 8) 1/1/15 (ring).  As the last two rounds are mainly a defense of the presumed lead of the non-resting rounds, the fighter looks to extend the decision gap that the fighter may have in the end by insuring the fighter won one or both of the rounds between the ninth and tenth round.  The hard power of the ninth round looks to hit the judges who favor more powerful punches, where the tenth round looks to out score the opponent in punch count 9) 5/7/8 (ring), 10) 6/4/10 (ring).  Between the first and tenth rounds it is presumed that the fighter is leading the fight at most seven rounds to the opponent's three rounds, won when the fighter was resting.  Since this might be the case, the fighter looks to finish the fight heavily defending himself, looking to withstand any allouts his opponent may throw at him and winning the fight with the decision of seven rounds won over the opponents five 11) 2/2/16 (ring), 12) 2/1/17 (ring).  The three rounds resting would give the fighter a probable endurance advantage as the two fighters head into the last two rounds able to withstand any desperate last attempts from his opponent to finish the fight in standing fashion. 
 

Example 2:

 

1) 4h/10/6 (clinch)

2) if hiscuts > mycuts then 5h/10/5 (inside)

10) if opp=strong and score <=2 and score >=-2 then 8/1/11 (clinch)

2) if opp=hurt then 4h/8/8 (allout)

 

 

This would be representative of an FP that would be used with a slugger against a balanced type fighter.  From round one the fighter is throwing low and hard to the head looking for injuries 1) 4h/10/6 (clinch).  If his opponents cuts become greater than his own than he will start throwing a few more punches to the head using the inside fighting style to work on those injuries 2) if hiscuts > mycuts then 5h/10/5 (inside). If his opponent ever becomes hurt or his endurance is about 33% or lower then the fighter will go all out in a calculated fashion looking for the knockout 2) if opp=hurt then 4h/8/8 (allout).  However, beginning in the tenth round, if the opponent never becomes hurt and actually has 66% or more of his endurance left the fighter switches tactics if his corner thinks the fight is between winning by 2 or losing by 2 10) if opp=strong and score <=2 and score >=-2 then 8/1/11 (clinch).  In this case the fighter is looking to win the last few rounds by decision and not looking to cause any more damage, unless his opponent over throws and his opponents endurance drops below 33% in the finishing rounds where the fighter will look for the knockout, throwing caution to the wind with his own left over endurance 2) if opp=hurt then 4h/8/8 (allout).

 

Example 3:

 

1) 7/1/12 (outside)

2) if score >=1 then 1/1/14 (ring)

10) if score <=2 then 9/1/10 (outside)

 

This would be an example of a fight plan for a tall agile weak fighter against a shorter speedy slugger.  The fighter comes out throwing very high and protecting himself looking to win the round in punch counts 1) 7/1/12 (outside).  Beginning in the second round if the fighter is winning by one according to his corner he will come out and rest that round until the next round 2) if score >=1 then 1/1/14 (ring).  As each round progresses, the fight resolver will determine if the corner thinks the fight is a draw or the fighter is losing and will throw 7/1/12 (outside) if he is, or if the corner thinks the fighter is ahead in the score cards by at least 1 then the fighter will come out resting 1/1/14 (ring).  At the beginning of the tenth round, if the corner believes the fighter is only winning by 2 or less the fighter will throw a higher amount of punches to finish the fight for the decision 10) if score <=2 then 9/1/10 (outside).  Resting the fighter is important to maintain the fighter's endurance for the end game of the fight, but it could leave the fighter wide open for all out attacks from his opponent.

 

Example 4:

 

1) 10/1/9 (clinch)

2) if score >=1 then 4b/12!/4 (clinch)

2) if score >=1 and warn >=2 then 4b/12/4 (clinch)

2) if opp = tired and score <=1 then 7/7/6 (clinch)

2) if opp = tired and score > 1 then 4h/12/4 (clinch)

2) if opp = hurt then 6h/10/4 (clinch)

 

 

In this fight plan, the fighter is looking to brawl and flail at a more agile opponent who may seek to win the fight by decision.  Everything about this particular fight plan is mainly anchored by the first round as the second round holds all the conditions and variables that the fighter will take if any of those statements become true to the fight resolver.  In the first round the fighter comes out throwing very high amount of punches looking to win the round over the more agile or speedy opponent 1) 10/1/9 (clinch).  In the second round, the fight resolver will begin at the bottom and looks for the next correct statement in the fight plan.  Since the opponent wouldn't probably be hurt or tired after the first round of pitter patter punches it would be presumed that the fighter would be ahead by one and hasn't been warned by the referee for any fouls.  So the next true statement for the fight resolver would most likely be the second statement in the fight plan 2) if score >=1 then 4b/12!/4 (clinch).  The fighter would come out in the second round throwing hard to the body and probably throw in a cheap shot to cause some extra damage to his opponent.  If the opponent is still strong, and the referee has warned the fighter two or more times about cheating then the fighter will stop throwing cheap shots and go to simply throwing strong to the body 2) if score >=1 and warn >=2 then 4b/12/4 (clinch).  Notice in the first two lines of the second round also look to see if the fighter is ahead by one according to his corner, if he is not he will come out the next round looking to win the round by decision, reverting back to the first round statement.  The back and forth of looking to win the round and be ahead by one, then going hard to the opponents body, will continue until and if the opponent becomes tired or hurt.  If the opponent becomes hurt and the fighter is leading by one in the fight according to his corner, then the fighter will come out and throw hard to the head looking to cause damage to his opponent while his opponent tries to catch up in the scoring 2) if opp = tired and score > 1 then 4h/12/4 (clinch).  If the score isn't greater than one according to the fighters corner and the opponent is tired, then the fighter will come out throwing very high and hard amount of punches, looking to either win the rounds by decision and or cause damage to his opponent 2) if opp = tired and score <=1 then 7/7/6 (clinch).  This line also looks to defuse the use of the first round statement and throw just a little less but more powerful punches if the opponent becomes tired and the score becomes less than or equal to one.  If the opponent ever becomes hurt then the fighter will revert to the last statement and throw a fair amount of hard punches to the head, looking to add more pressure to his opponent when the opponent is at his weakest 2) if opp = hurt then 6h/10/4 (clinch).  This fight plan looks to confuse a dancer type of opponent while the stronger fighter will look to win the fight by either decision or by knocking out his opponent. 

 

 

Example 5:

 

1) 5h/5/10 (ring)

2) if end <=120*.75 and score >=2 then 1/1/12 (ring)

2) if end >=120*.75 and score <=1 then 9/1/10 (ring)

10) if opp = tired and end >=120*.66 and score >=2 then 5h/10/5 (chase)

10) if opp = tired and end <=120*.66 and score <=1 then 7/1/12 (ring)

12) 5h/5/10 (ring)

12) if score <=1 then 8/1/11 (ring)

12) if opp = hurt and end >=120*.45 and mycuts < 2 then 4h/8/8 (allout)

 

 

This fight plan would be representative of one used with a balanced type of fighter who may be facing a slugger or another stronger balanced type fighter, where the fight plan will be gauging the fighter's endurance compared to his opponents.  In the first round the fighter will come out throwing even amount of stinging punches while protecting himself from the stronger opponent 1) 5h/5/10 (ring). From the second to the ninth round the fight plan will be judging the fighter's endurance in relation to what the score is, reverting back to the first round if none of the second round statements are correct.  If the fighter is facing a round where he has more endurance than 75% of his starting endurance of 120 that came from the 12 points of toughness he started with, and the score is equal or less than one according to his corner's scoring of the fight then the fighter will come out throwing very high amount of weak punches looking to win the round by decision 2) if end >=120*.75 and score <=1 then 9/1/10 (ring).  However if the fighter is facing a round where he doesn't have more than 75% of his starting endurance and the score is greater than two according to his corner than the fighter will look to rest that round to preserve his endurance for the finishing rounds 2) if end <=120*.75 and score >=2 then 1/1/12 (ring).  If neither of the second round statements are true; the fighter isn't tired and isn't losing; then the fight plan will revert back to the first round statement 1) 5h/5/10 (ring).  This will continue until the tenth round where conditions of the fight and the fight plan may change the way the fighter fights out the tenth and eleventh rounds.  If when the tenth round comes and the opponent is tired, or at 66% or less of his starting endurance, and the fighter also is tired, and the score is equal or less than one according to the fighter's corner, then the fighter will look to win the tenth and eleventh round by decision, throwing a high amount of weak punches while protecting himself 10) if opp = tired and end <=120*.66 and score <=1 then 7/1/12 (ring).  However if the opponent is tired and the fighter has more than 66% of his starting endurance of 120 and the score is greater than two according to the fighter's corner then the fighter will come out and take advantage of his endurance edge and take the fight to his opponent with an average and powerful amount of punches in the hopes to wear him down further 10) if opp = tired and end >=120*.66 and score >=2 then 5h/10/5 (chase).  If the fighter's opponent is not tired during the tenth or eleventh round then the fight plan will revert back to the second round conditionals, where if the fighter isn't losing or isn't hurt will continue with the first round statement.  Coming to the twelfth and final round, the fight plan uses an anchoring statement so that if neither of the two other twelfth round conditionals are not true to the fight resolver then the fight plan will not look for any of the second or tenth round statements 12) 5h/5/10 (ring).  If the score is less than or equal to one according to the fighter's corner than the fighter will try to win the last round by decision, by throwing a high amount of weak punches while protecting himself 12) if score <=1 then 8/1/11 (ring).  If the fighter's opponent is hurt or 33% or less of his starting endurance and the fighter has more than 45% of his starting endurance and the fighter's cuts are less than 2 then the fighter will look to finish the fight by KO, insuring the victory 12) if opp = hurt and end >=120*.45 and mycuts < 2 then 4h/8/8 (allout).  However, if the fighter's opponent is not hurt and the score is greater than one according to the fighter's corner then the fight resolver will use the next correct statement in the fight plan where the fighter will throw even hard punches while protecting himself well 12) 5h/5/10 (ring).  This fight plan looks to win by KO if the opponent becomes hurt or to try to win the fight by decision, by gauging his endurance compared to his opponents.

 

ALCATRAZ GYM FIGHTERS

 

The Alcatraz Gym is a "robot" type gym set up by the commissioners to enhance the game play.  Primarily the fighters in this gym have basically one or another fight plan.  Copy and paste these fight plans when sparring against these opponents.  Scout the opponent to identify the possible fight plan they are using. 

 

Dancer -

 

1) 4H/6/10 (ring)
2) if score >=1 then 4b/6/10 (ring)
if score <1 then 7h/4/9 (ring)
3) if score >=4 then 3h/6/11 (ring)
if score =3 then 1/1/15 (ring)
if score =2 then 4b/6/10 (ring)
if score =1 then 5b/5/10 (ring)
if score <1 then 9/4/7 (ring)
if score <=-2 then 5b/6/9 (ring)
8) if score >=4 then 3h/6/11 (ring)
if score =3 then 1/1/15 (ring)
if score =2 then 4H/6/10 (ring)
if score =1 then 5h/5/10 (ring)
if score <1 then 9h/4/7 (ring)
if score <=-2 then 6b/5/9 (ring)
9) if score >=1 then 4h/7/9 (ring)
if score <1 then 6h/5/9 (ring)
if score <0 then 9h/4/7 (ring)
if score <=-3 then 5h/7!/8 (ring)
12) if score >=2 then 1/1/18 (ring)
if score <2 then 9h/4/7 (ring)
if score <=-2 then 5h/7!/8 (ring)

 

Slugger -

 

1) 4h/9/7 (clinch)
2) 4b/9/7 (clinch)
if opp is tired then 5b/9/6 (clinch)
if opp is hurt then 5h/10/5 (inside)
8) if score >=2 then 5h/10/5 (clinch)
if score <2 then 5h/11/4 (clinch)
if opp is hurt then 5h/10/5 (allout)
11) if score >=2 then 5h/10/5 (clinch)
if score <2 then 5h/11/4 (inside)
if score <=-2 then 5h/10/5 (allout)
if opp is hurt then 5h/11/4 (allout)

 

Super Heavy Weight -

 

1) 4h/7/9 (outside)
2) if score>=1 then 4b/7/9 (outside)
if score <1 then 6h/4/10 (outside)
3) if score >=4 then 3h/6/11 (outside)
if score =3 then 1/1/15 (outside)
if score <3 then 4b/7/9 (outside)
if score <=0 then 7/4/9 (outside)
if score <=-3 then 5b/6/9 (outside)
9) if score >=2 then 4h/7/9 (outside)
if score <2 then 7h/4/9 (outside)
if score <=-3 then 5h/6!/9 (outside)
11) if score >=2 then 4h/7/9 (outside)
if score <2 then 7h/4/9 (outside)
if score <=-3 then 4h/8!/8 (allout)

 

 

FIGHT PLAN HELP Index

 

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